Impossible is Nothing.

Impossible is just a big word thrown around by small men who find it easier to live the world they’ve been given than to explore the power they have to change it. Impossible is not a fact. It’s an opinion. Impossible is not a declaration. It’s a dare. Impossible is potential. Impossible is temporary. Impossible is nothing.

Attributed to Muhammad Ali.

5 thoughts on “Impossible is Nothing.

  1. Claire

    Hi,

    I was in Skirack downtown this evening and I struck up conversation with one of the employees, who noticed my scars from – yes – chronic exertional compartment syndrome. He immediately turned me onto your blog, saying you were a friend of the store and a pacesetter for runvermont. I am interested in learning more about your experience in PT, recovery, etc. I am 5 weeks post-op and cannot wait to get back on the trail!

    Thanks and happy running,
    Claire

    Reply
    1. runnerunderpressure

      Hi Claire:
      Ah, another CECSer! The best chronicle of my blog is to actually go backwards to right after surgery when I was writing almost daily, April of 2010. If you go by search terms, you can try clicking on recovery, scars etc. My experience was not a great one; it took me a lot longer to transition off of crutches than the surgeon expected and I didn’t run for almost 6 months. Are you weight bearing yet? Who are you working with for PT? I found PT to be enormously helpful because they pushed me when I was avoiding pain and held me back when I was trying to do too much. I think by week 6, I was in the pool jogging with a belt on. I’ll look back tonight to refresh my memory too.

      Sarah

      Reply
      1. Claire

        Sarah,

        I was reliant on crutches for just over a week, and then used them for balance whenever leaving the house. I had my surgery 12/19 and have been biking (gently) for almost 3 weeks now. In addition, I have been swimming (some light kicking, but mostly with a leg floater). I am beyond anxious to begin running and training again – it’s been so long! I haven’t gone for a *real* run since August or September, and I miss it dearly – nothing provides that same feeling. I’m working at Green Mountain Rehab, but am only able to stretch somewhat and massage, no strengthening quite yet. I am just thankful I can walk to and from classes again.

        Was it really 6 months before you ran? Or did you jog before then?

        I will definitely explore your past blog entries.

        Claire

        Reply
  2. runnerunderpressure

    Claire:
    It took me a long time to get off of crutches because I developed a blood clot, which came with a hospital stay, swelling and a ton of pain. I used crutches for about 6 weeks, then for balance or long walks for a couple more. I was jogging at about 10 weeks, two to three minutes at at time. For most of the summer, I could only run on the treadmill or a flat track without symptoms recurring. Even then, I had calf cramps that doubled me over. In going through my running log, I didn’t run at any sort of a normal pace until October. Once I got through October and had a couple of good cracks from scar tissue adhesion (it’ll happen, you’ll hear it, panic, then realize your leg feels a ton better.)

    Green Mountain Rehab is GREAT, and I’m glad you’re working with a PT. It makes a huge difference to have feedback from someone.

    The one major difference is that I ran up until three days before surgery, as I’d already been diagnosed and was trying the conservative route until I started to lose feeling all the time, not just while running. I met Slauterbeck at the end of a week and was on the OR table the following Wednesday.

    Sarah

    Reply
  3. Claire

    Sarah:

    I did a five-minute, 10 min pace barefoot treadmill run the night before my surgery, but I couldn’t get around campus by foot all fall semester, and had to pause after every few stairs. I appreciate you sending me your training log, and it’s so comforting to hear that I am in good hands. I have been a little sore from working on the adhesions, which are worse in my right leg (and subsequently are more painful), but the cracking will be interesting.

    It’s interesting, because looking back, my symptoms first appeared during my half in May 2011 as severe lower calf pain, almost like achilles tendonitis, but it wasn’t until August that I began noticing a substantial increase in symptoms. Also, I only had my anterior and lateral compartments released (in both legs, though), as my doc thought that although the levels were diagnostic, the double release would solve the problem. I was (and still am) a bit apprehensive, but only time will tell.

    Claire

    Reply

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